Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Lymph & Longevity by Gerald Lemole

Book cover
Lymph & Longevity
by Gerald Lemole


ISBN-13: 9781982180256
Hardcover: 160 pages
Publisher: Scribner
Released: October 5th 2021

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
Learn how you can boost your immune system and help prevent virtually every major medical condition—including cancer, heart disease, neurological disorders, GI issues, and obesity—by keeping your lymph system healthy, as explained by renowned cardiologist Gerald Lemole.

The lymphatic system serves as our body’s maintenance department and has a direct effect on our cardiovascular, neurological, and immune systems. At last, renowned cardiothoracic surgeon and pioneer in the study of lymph Gerald Lemole explains in straightforward language why the lymphatic system is the key factor in longevity and disease prevention, and how improving lymphatic flow can help our bodies eliminate the toxins and waste products that contribute to injury, inflammation, and disease.

In ten short chapters he demystifies the lymphatic system, describes how powerful it is, and shows how to maintain a healthy lymph system to combat specific diseases and health problems—from heart disease to cognitive function to weight management. Featuring sidebars with charts and graphs that illustrate basic principles, The Healing Power of Flow also includes flow-friendly menus, recipes, and information on supplements, as well as basic yoga and meditation guides.


My Review:
Lymph & Longevity is an overview of how the lymphatic system works, why good lymph flow is important to long-term health, and ways to get your lymph moving. He talked about using food, supplements, exercise, and different relaxation techniques to help improve lymph flow. He even included recipes and described a yoga-pose sequence for improving lymph flow. He initially talked about how poor lymph flow can cause chronic health problems, like heart and brain problems. He didn't get very technical, and it's written in a conversation tone that's easy to read and understand. Overall, I'd recommend this book to those who don't know much about the lymphatic system and why it's important.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Sunday, October 3, 2021

Encyclopedia of the Ordinary Things by Stepanka Sekaninova

Book cover
Encyclopedia of the Ordinary Things
by Stepanka Sekaninova


ISBN-13: 9788000061283
Hardcover: 96 pages
Publisher: Albatros Media
Released: October 5th 2021

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
We use them daily, pass them by, and it never occurs to us to stop and think about where they came from. Shoes, umbrellas, toothbrushes, toothpicks, socks, dolls, and so on and so forth. How did they come to be? Who invented them? How did they develop and change over time?


My Review:
Encyclopedia of the Ordinary Things is about the history of ten common items and is targeted at ages 6-12 years old. The author covered skates, umbrellas, glasses, dolls, perfume, horse toys, toilets, toothbrushes, beds, and tights. Each item had several pages describing how the item changed throughout history and appeared in different cultures. It's not a lot of information, though, since illustrations took up half of the page space. These illustrations were stylistic rather than highly accurate. Each section concluded with two pages of related items, usually focusing on the inventor of the item (Velcro, zippers, skies, etc.). These were very brief so that several items would fit on each page.

I was disappointed that the author put in speculation when I would have preferred facts. For example, when explaining: "The soles of some prehistoric shoes were made from bear skin....Our ancestors believed that bear skin would give them the strength of the feared animal and protect them." How do we know what they believed? We don't. Prehistory means they didn't leave writing saying this. It's just a guess. I felt like it was misleading to call this book an encyclopedia due to how few items were covered, the speculation included, and the stylistic illustrations. The items weren't even listed in alphabetical order. If you just want a brief overview on these objects, though, it did have some interesting trivia.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Tuesday, September 28, 2021

The Story of the Country House by Clive Aslet

Book cover
The Story of the Country House
by Clive Aslet


ISBN-13: 9780300255058
Hardcover: 256 pages
Publisher: Yale University Press
Released: September 28th 2021

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
The Story of the Country House is an authoritative and vivid account of the British country house, exploring how they have evolved with the changing political and economic landscape. Clive Aslet reveals the captivating stories behind individual houses, their architects, and occupants, and paints a vivid picture of the wider context in which the country house in Britain flourished and subsequently fell into decline before enjoying a renaissance in the twenty-first century.

The genesis, style, and purpose of architectural masterpieces such as Hardwick Hall, Hatfield House, and Chatsworth are explored, alongside the numerous country houses lost to war and economic decline. We also meet a cavalcade of characters, owners with all their dynastic obsessions and diverse sources of wealth, and architects such as Inigo Jones, Sir John Vanbrugh, Robert Adam, Sir John Soane and A.W.N. Pugin, who dazzled or in some cases outraged their contemporaries.


My Review:
The Story of the Country House talked about the changes in the British country house (as found throughout the United Kingdom) from the Roman villa and Medieval manor house to modern times. The author broke the subject into time periods and talked about the social customs and developing technologies that influenced the layout and look of the houses. He talked about the people who built country houses (the owners and the architects) and about specific houses (including a picture, usually of the outside). He also talked about the different architectural styles and briefly about trends in landscaping styles, location selection, house size, etc. I'd recommend this book to those interested in the people who built and wider social context of British country houses.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Garden Allies by Frederique Lavoipierre

Book cover
Garden Allies
by Frederique Lavoipierre


ISBN-13: 9781643260082
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Timber Press
Released: Sept. 28, 2021

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
The birds, mammals, reptiles, and insects that inhabit our yards and gardens are overwhelmingly on our side—they are not our enemies, but instead our allies. They pollinate our flowers and vegetable crops, and they keep pests in check.

In Garden Allies, Frédérique Lavoipierre shares fascinating portraits of these creatures, describing their life cycles and showing how they keep the garden’s ecology in balance. Also included is helpful information on how to nurture and welcome these valuable creatures into your garden. With beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Craig Latker, Garden Allies invites you to make friends with the creatures that fill your garden.


My Review:
Garden Allies talks about the different types of insects and animals that you might find in a garden. It's not really a practical, how-to gardening guide since the focus wasn't really on the garden but on the animals that you might find there (and elsewhere). The author talked about various categories of animals and wrote a few pages about each category (like worms, bees, wasps, flies, beetles, etc.). It covered things like nesting habits, what they eat, social behavior, and why gardeners might appreciate having them in the garden. Each section ended with profile-type information: their official names, what they look like, etc. Black and white drawings of the mentioned critters were sometimes included, but I didn't find them particularly helpful in terms of insect identification. Overall, I'd recommend this book to those interested in learning more about garden animals.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Pain Erasers by Michelle Schoffro Cook

Book cover
Pain Erasers
by Michelle Schoffro Cook


ISBN-13: 9781953295514
Kindle: 272 pages
Publisher: BenBella Books
Released: September 21st 2021

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
If you’re struggling with chronic or acute pain, you may find that commonly prescribed medications are often expensive, and often ineffective. They can also lead to unwanted side-effects or serious drug interactions. That’s where Pain Erasers can help. This long-awaited guide to drug-free pain relief offers a wide variety of natural alternatives to help you take control of your pain—and ultimately, your life.

Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM, a trusted natural medicine expert, will reveal new ways to naturally erase your pain, often permanently! You’ll discover dozens of natural painkillers, from a little-known but highly effective resin from the rainforest, along with such standbys as ginger and turmeric. And to boost the effects of these remedies, you’ll get helpful tips on how to change your diet and lifestyle for optimal health and pain and inflammation management.

Because not every remedy works on every type of pain, Dr. Schoffro Cook guides readers through the best methods for specific conditions, such as back pain, fibromyalgia, joint pain, migraines and headaches, neck pain, plantar fasciitis, temporomandibular joint syndrome, tendonitis, trigeminal neuralgia, whiplash, and more.


My Review:
Pain Erasers talked about some natural remedies for pain. She focused mostly on using essential oils and strongly favored using the doTerra brand. However, she did have an informative section at the end which talked about making changes in your diet to promote anti-inflammatory foods and remove inflammatory foods as well as suggested some useful supplements. She started by telling her story and then doing short profiles on different types of pain. In these profiles, she briefly described the problem and listed the best remedies for that type of pain. For most of the problems, there was a lot of overlap on which were the best remedies (which is probably good news).

She then went into greater depth about each of these remedies. For each profile, she gave the common name as well as the Latin name, a brief history about the herb's use, some scientific information about how it works and how effective it is, information on how to use it as an herb or essential oil, and safety considerations like whether it's safe to ingest and how to safely do that. She also briefly explained other things the herb is good for.

In the safety section, she seemed to start with the exact same warning with only the herb's name changed. I thought it was odd that she was so concerned with dangerous solvent residues in the essential oils. Almost all of her suggested essential oils are steam distilled, so the solvent is water. Also, oregano oil is usually the herb steeped in an oil for some time, the herb strained out, and the oil ingested with food. This is not meant to be deceptive (as she implies) as they don't claim it's an ESSENTIAL oil. Even if an essential oil comes diluted in a carrier oil, they should clearly list that on the bottle.

I've already been using a number of these remedies for my rheumatoid arthritis pain. I generally felt like I knew more about the essential oils than she did. However, this is a good source of information for someone new to the topic of using essential oils and diet for pain relief.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Herbal Antivirals, 2nd Edition by Stephen Harrod Buhner

Book cover
Herbal Antivirals, 2nd Edition
by Stephen Harrod Buhner


ISBN-13: 9781635864175
Paperback: 480 pages
Publisher: Storey Publishing
Released: August 31st 2021

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
Viruses are smart, mutating, and becoming resistant to antiviral pharmaceuticals. Global crises such as COVID-19, SARS, and dengue feaver spread more quickly than we can develop medicines to fight them. Herbalist and best-selling author Stephen Harrod Buhner has studied the antiviral properties of plants for many years. In this comprehensive guide, he profiles the plants that have proven most effective in fighting viral infections and provides in-depth instructions for preparing and using formulations to address the most common infections and strengthen immunity, safely and naturally. The updated 2nd edition includes an expanded guide to COVID-19, including a review of the most up-to-date medical research and the plant medicines that have been found to be most potent in preventing infection, lessening the impact of the virus on the body, and addressing longer-term effects and co-infections.


My Review:
Herbal Antivirals, 2nd Edition describes the mode of action of different types of viral infections and how different herbs work to prevent these viral infections. The author began with a look at several types of viruses (influenza, coronaviruses, viral encephalitis, etc.). He provided some history about the disease, very detailed information about how that type of viral infection acts on the body, how different herbs block specific modes of action by the virus (thus helping stop the virus), and the dosing and herbs used for different stages of infection. He strongly suggested the use of tinctures as the best way to get a high enough dosing to be effective.

The information on COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2 was written in August 2020, over a year ago, and much of what was predicted (and included in this book) hasn't turn out to be as bad a predicted. I don't know if this section will be further updated before the publish date, but I didn't find a long section of what felt like panic propaganda to be very useful. He did include information about how the virus acted on the body and what herbs should help treat it.

The main, second section profiled several of the most useful antiviral herbs. The author described the common and Latin names of the medicinal herbs, the parts used for antiviral action, the dosage (usually as tinctures, but also powder or decoction), potential side effects, contraindications, herb/drug or herb/herb interactions, a list of medicinal actions, what it can be used to treat, the plant's chemistry, traditional uses, and scientific research on the herbs effectiveness against viruses and such. He also provided information about the plant in general, the habitat where the plant naturally grows and can be harvested, how to grow it, and where to buy it. He ended by describing some other ways (nutrition, some other herbs, etc.) to support the immune system and fight viral infections.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Saturday, August 28, 2021

Toxic Legacy by Stephanie Seneff

Book cover
Toxic Legacy
by Stephanie Seneff


ISBN-13: 9781603589307
Hardcover: 262 pages
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing Company
Released: June 1st 2021

Source: Bought.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
From an MIT scientist, mounting evidence that the active ingredient in the world’s most commonly used weedkiller is contributing to skyrocketing rates of chronic disease.

Glyphosate is the active ingredient in Roundup, the most commonly used weedkiller in the world. Nearly 300 million pounds of glyphosate-based herbicide are sprayed on farms―and food―every year. Agrochemical companies claim that glyphosate is safe for humans, animals, and the environment. But emerging scientific research on glyphosate’s deadly disruption of the gut microbiome, its crippling effect on protein synthesis, and its impact on the body’s ability to use and transport sulfur―not to mention several landmark legal cases― tells a very different story.

In Toxic Legacy, senior research scientist Stephanie Seneff, PhD, delivers compelling evidence based on countless published, peer-reviewed studies. Readers will discover the uniquely toxic nature of glyphosate; how glyphosate disrupts the microbiome, leading to gut dysbiosis, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration, and more; why we’re seeing a rise in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, infertility, depression, and anxiety; glyphosate’s role in soil degeneration, water contamination, and threats to wildlife and biodiversity; and important nutritional guidance for conscientious consumers who want to avoid glyphosate-contaminated foods and improve their health.

As Rachel Carson did with DDT in the 1960’s, Stephanie Seneff sounds the alarm on glyphosate, giving you guidance on simple, powerful changes you can make right now and essential information you need to protect your health, your family’s health, and the planet on which we all depend.


My Review:
Toxic Legacy describes how glyphosate is harmful to human health. The book is suitable both for scientists and non-scientists, but it can get technical. The author described in detail the mechanisms for how glyphosate does it's damage in a way that will convince scientists. She tried to describe the detailed scientific information in a way that the common person can follow (especially if you have some science background), but she also summarized her main points at the end of each section in a way that anyone can understand. The first few chapters and the last one are the easiest to understand, and the last chapter focused on what you can do to avoid the harm caused by glyphosate. Many of these suggestions are diet related, like buy Certified Organic food to minimalize glyphosate residue. While not the easiest read, I'd still highly recommend this important book to everyone and I've bought some additional copies to give to family members.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.